Hire wordpress plugin development
This Is Your Brain on Music
by Daniel J. Levitin
September 12, 2022
T. Alex Blum

We all know that music is special to us, but have you ever stopped to ask yourself why? This book, written by a neuroscientist with deep practical knowledge of music, delivers fascinating insights into the how and the why.

This book is recommended by an incredible array of music industry critics, music publications, recording and sound engineers, and musicians, including Sting and David Byrne, among others, with good reason.

I think most of us recognize how deeply we associate songs from our past with memories, and this book delves into the deep connection between music and memory. It explains how music connects disparate areas of the brain in ways that no other form of communication does and delves into the special relevance it may have for those on the autistic spectrum.

It covers a lot of territory including the role of music in society, the recent history and evolution of music, and all sorts of other fascinating facts, theories, and factoids. This is a deeply scholarly and scientific book which is at the same time completely readable, not particularly long, and downright fascinating.

I suspect almost all of us have some sort of special connection with the music we love, and music in general, and I think it is fair to say that music is a connection that can be shared by every society and culture on earth. This is one of the only books I have read that illuminates with studies, facts, and science some of the reasons why that is true.

If you care about music, and I think most of us do, reading this book is a worthwhile investment of your time.

And Dr. Levitin makes the case that 10,000 hours of practice, not natural talent, is what makes a musical virtuoso; and here’s something interesting for you Malcolm Gladwell fans - he wrote it in this book twelve years before it was "popularized" by Malcolm Gladwell.

We all know that music is special to us, but have you ever stopped to ask yourself why? This book, written by a neuroscientist with deep practical knowledge of music, delivers fascinating insights into the how and the why.

This book is recommended by an incredible array of music industry critics, music publications, recording and sound engineers, and musicians, including Sting and David Byrne, among others, with good reason.

I think most of us recognize how deeply we associate songs from our past with memories, and this book delves into the deep connection between music and memory. It explains how music connects disparate areas of the brain in ways that no other form of communication does and delves into the special relevance it may have for those on the autistic spectrum. It covers a lot of territory including the role of music in society, the recent history and evolution of music, and all sorts of other fascinating facts, theories, and factoids. This is a deeply scholarly and scientific book which is at the same time completely readable, not particularly long, and downright fascinating.

I suspect almost all of us have some sort of special connection with the music we love, and music in general, and I think it is fair to say that music is a connection that can be shared by every society and culture on earth. This is one of the only books I have read that illuminates with studies, facts, and science some of the reasons why that is true.

If you care about music, and I think most of us do, reading this book is a worthwhile investment of your time.

And Dr. Levitin makes the case that 10,000 hours of practice, not natural talent, is what makes a musical virtuoso; and here’s something interesting for you Malcolm Gladwell fans - he wrote it in this book twelve years before it was "popularized" by Malcolm Gladwell.